Friday, June 14, 2019

The Scenic Route To Go Interfaces

Go is an awesome language and interfaces are one of its most powerful features. They allow for decoupling pieces of code cleanly to help make components like database implementations interchangeable. They're the primary mechanism for dependency injection without requiring a DI framework.

Newcomers are often mystified by them but I think they're less confusing if you get to them via the scenic route. Let's look at creating our own types in Go. Along the way we'll find parallels that help make interfaces more clear.

Sidebar: Java Interfaces

If you're not experienced with Java, move on to the next section. Nothing to see here.

If you're experienced with Java, Go interfaces will be pretty familiar and comfortable. The key difference is that a class in Java must explicitly implement a predefined interface. In Go, any type that has the proper method signatures implements an interface, even interfaces created after the type. In Go, implementing an interface is implicit.

Custom Primitive Types

Go emphasizes simple, clear types. You can define your own to help model your problem space. Here I might want to capture a set of boolean flags in one variable:

type BitFlags int32
  • I'm defining my own type
  • I'm giving it the name BitFlags
  • It represents an int32
Why not just use int32 if that's what I want?

One reason is methods. I can attach methods to a type I've defined to give my type additional behavior. Perhaps I define a bunch of constants to represent individual flags and I provide methods like IsSet(BitFlag) bool and Set(BitFlag).

Another reason is explicit type conversion. In other languages it's valid to assign a 64 bit integer variable to a 32 bit integer variable. They're both integers so it's logical to do so. However, you're possibly losing the high 32 bits of the source value. There's an implicit type conversion happening that is often silent and often surprising.

Go doesn't allow implicit type conversions:

i32 := int32(17)
var bf BitFlags
bf = i32 // not allowed
bf = BitFlags(i32) // just fine

This is done to eliminate surprises. The compiler isn't silently setting a type conversion that can change your data without your knowledge. It requires that you state that you want the conversion. This makes it harder for users of the BitFlags type to accidentally provide a numeric value that shouldn't be interpreted as flags.

Custom Struct Types

type Foo struct {
A string
B int
}
  • I'm defining my own type
  • I'm giving it the name Foo
  • It contains the following data
Structs allow you to bundle pieces of data together into a single item. That item can be passed around as a unit. Like custom primitive types, custom struct types can have methods attached.

Also like custom primitive types you can assign one to the other if they are equivalent using an explicit type cast:

type Foo struct {
A string
B int
}

type Bar struct {
A string
B int
}

func main() {
f := Foo{A: "foo", B: 3}
var b Bar
b = f // invalid
b = Bar(f) // just fine
}

Custom Interface Types

An interface type specifies requirements for behavior. Methods are behavior which is why we tend to name them with verbs or action phrases. In go, any type that has those exact method signatures satisfies the interface's requirements.

type Storage interface {
Create(key string, o Object) error
Read(key string) (Object, error)
Update(key string, o Object) error
Delete(key string) error
}

  • I'm defining my own type
  • I'm giving it the name Storage
  • Anything with these methods qualifies as this type

Using interfaces I can define requirements for a storage system for my application to use. My application needs something through which I can create, read, update, and delete objects associated with a given key.

func GeneratePDFReport(output io.Writer, storage Storage) error {
// ...
}

My application isn't concerned with how those operations are actually performed. The underlying storage could be an SQL database, S3 bucket, local files, Mongo, Redis, or anything that can be adapted to do those four things. Perhaps the report generator supports many storage mechanisms and when the application starts it decides which storage to use based on a config file or flags. It also means that when I need to write tests for my report generator I don't need to have an actual SQL database or write files to disk; I can create an implementation of Storage that only works with test data and behaves in an entirely predictable way.

Interface nil and Type Assertions

For all variables of interface types the runtime keeps track of two things: the underlying value and that value's type. This leads to two different ways an interface variable can be nil. First, the interface value itself can be nil. In this case there's no type information, no underlying value; nothing to talk about. This is very common with the error interface. In the case of no error the interface variable itself is nil because there's no error to be communicated.

In the second case there's type information but the underlying value is nil. A comparison like myInt == nil returns false because the interface value exists and points to type information. Ideally in this case nil is useful for that type as in the final example in Dave Cheney's zero post.

If needed you can get at the underlying value inside an interface variable.

io.Writer is a commonly-used interface. It has only one method: Write([]byte) (int, error). If I have a variable out of type io.Writer the only operation I can perform on it is Write. What if I want to Close it? Ideally if you have Close as an requirement you should make Close part of the interface type of your variable (or use io.WriteCloser instead of io.Writer).

For the purposes of illustration you can do a type assertion. This asks that the runtime verify that the underlying thing in your variable is of a certain type:

if c, ok := out.(io.WriteCloser); ok {
err := c.Close()
// handle error
} else {
// not an io.WriteCloser!
}

In the above example, if out happens to be an io.WriteCloser then ok will be true and c will be out as type io.WriteCloser. If out doesn't happen to be an io.WriteCloser, ok is false and c is zero for io.WriteCloser which is nil.

Anonymous Struct Types

Given a preexisting struct type I can create a value of that with data in one statement:

f := Foo{
A: "foo",
B: 17,
}
  • I'm creating a variable f
  • It is of type Foo
  • It contains these values

In the above struct examples each of the types I defined have a name; this isn't always necessary providing I'm creating the struct on the spot and assigning it somewhere.

ff := struct {
A string
B int
}{
A: "foo",
B: 17,
}



  • I'm creating a variable ff

  • It is of this type

  • It contains these values

  • Like the named struct types above I can do an assignment with an explicit type conversion:

    f = ff // invalid
    f = Foo(ff) // totally fine

    This sort of anonymous struct type is common in table driven tests. It's also not uncommon in defining nested structs as mholt's JSON to Go converter does.

    You'll also sometimes see this:

    stringSet := map[string]struct{}{}



  • I'm creating a variable stringSet

  • It is of this type

  • It contains these values

  • The last part looks a little strange. It's a map with strings for keys but what are the values? The values are empty structs: they contain nothing and therefore take up no memory. What good is that? It's a map that only tracks the presence of keys which functions as a logical set. The final magenta curly braces define the initial contents of the map; it's empty.

    Anonymous Interfaces

    Just like you can have anonymous struct types you can have anonymous interface types. The following are equivalent:

    var foo io.Reader

    var foo interface{
    Read([]byte) (int, error)
    }

    In either case I can assign anything with a Read([]byte) (int, error) method to foo.

    We're near the end of our journey which brings us to the enigmatic interface{}:

    foo := interface{}{}
    var foo interface{} = nil
    • I'm defining a variable
    • I'm giving it the name foo
    • Anything with these methods qualifies as this type
    • The contents are explicitly zero
    interface{} is an anonymous interface type. It has no requirements so any value is suitable. I can pass around a value of type interface{} but I can't do anything with it without using a type assertion or the reflect package.

    In this way the empty interface is different than other interface types in that it doesn't specify required behavior. It sidesteps the type system and turns what could be compile-time errors into run-time errors. When writing code that uses the empty interface use great care.

    1 comment:

    1. http://www.golangprograms.com/go-language/interface.html

      ReplyDelete